All Sauce from Weekly Sauce:

Cora Oakley is a rough-and-tumble 4-year-old who loves gymnastics and outdoor activities, particularly if it involves bouncing on a trampoline. It’s hard to tell from looking at her that she was born without an immune system. Kids with this condition can acquire dangerous, life-threatening infections from day-to-day activities as simple as going to school or…  read on >  read on >

Not only have humans and their ancient ancestors been eating carbs for longer than was realized, but a new study finds these starchy foods may actually have played a part in the growth of the human brain. A new study researching the history of the human oral microbiome found that Neanderthals and ancient humans adapted…  read on >  read on >

Older Americans, especially those 85 and older, are having fewer abdominal surgeries than in decades past, a new study finds. The study examined data from 2002 to 2014, and was not able to tell the exact reasons for the trend. It might be that improvements in medical treatments and cancer screening for older adults are…  read on >  read on >

Feelings of grief are expected after the loss of a loved one, but having those feelings when your loved one has a terminal illness is also real and can fluctuate over time, experts say. Individuals can adjust to their emotional pain, according to a new study focusing on what is known as “pre-loss grief” observed…  read on >  read on >

WEDNESDAY, May 12, 2021 (American Heart Association News) — Doctors, hospitals and medical schools should take specific actions to fight the structural racism that threatens the health of millions of Americans, according to a new report meant to help guide the medical establishment. Among the recommendations, which are part of the 2020 American Heart Association…  read on >  read on >

It may be possible to treat the thinking problems that result from repeated hits to the head, a new laboratory study suggests. The new experiments with mice are the first to offer a molecular analysis of what happens in the brain after repetitive but mild blows to the head, said researcher Mark Burns. He is…  read on >  read on >

Serious cases of “long-haul COVID-19” are rare in patients who were not hospitalized after their infection, but these patients still report more doctor or health care visits after recovery,. Danish researchers report. The new six-month study found that COVID patients who were not hospitalized had small increased risks of blood clots and breathing difficulties. They…  read on >  read on >