Kids who were born large and whose mothers developed a form of diabetes during pregnancy have nearly triple the odds of becoming overweight or obese in childhood, new research shows. “Just like smoking, alcohol consumption and other lifestyle choices, [women’s] weight prior to getting pregnant, and weight gain and blood sugar control during pregnancy may…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Many women have nausea during the first trimester of pregnancy, sometimes called morning sickness. Symptoms tend to ease as the pregnancy progresses. The American Pregnancy Association suggests how to help manage morning sickness: Eat non-spicy foods rich in vitamin B6, including wholegrain wheat and other cereals, seeds and nuts, fruits such as…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — A young child who has chronic anxiety may have trouble learning, Harvard University researchers say. Fears of the dark, monsters or strangers are common and are considered normal and usually temporary. But when fears extend to physical, sexual or emotional abuse, they can affect a child’s developing brain, the researchers noted. The…  read on >

Children and teens who suffer a sports-related concussion should reduce, but not eliminate, physical and mental activity in the days after their injury, an American Academy of Pediatrics report says. “Athletes absolutely need to take an immediate break from play after a concussion, but we find that, during the recovery process, it is best to…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Temper tantrums are a way of getting attention and expressing displeasure among younger kids who can’t express their needs or control their emotions, the U.S. National Library of Medicine says. Tantrums tend to be worst between ages 2 and 3, and rarely occur after age 4. Being tired, hungry or sick can…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Childhood is the perfect time to start healthy eating habits, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. While children need fat in their diets to get the daily energy they need, too much fat can lead to health problems, especially if it’s in the form of saturated fat that can lead to heart…  read on >

If the last flu season is any indication, you need to take steps now to protect yourself against infection, an infectious diseases expert warns. The 2017-2018 flu season in the United States was the worst since the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began tracking the severity of annual flu seasons. There were nearly…  read on >

The antidepressant fluoxetine (Prozac) is ineffective in treating a rare, polio-like disorder that can cause muscle weakness and paralysis in children, researchers are reporting. In the United States, there have been 219 possible cases of acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) reported so far this year, and 80 have been confirmed, according to the U.S. Centers for…  read on >

Women confused by the conflicting advice surrounding the benefits and timing of mammograms will be interested in a new study out of Sweden. The research, involving more than 50,000 breast cancer patients, found that those who took part in a breast cancer screening program had a 60 percent lower risk of dying from the disease…  read on >

FRIDAY, Nov. 9, 2018 (American Heart Association) — Sudden cardiac arrest — when the heart stops beating — is one of the leading causes of death in the U.S. To help save lives, automated external defibrillators, which shock the heart back into a regular beat, have been placed in many public places. Now, these portable…  read on >