Exercise may do more than build body strength: New research shows it might also keep brain cells in shape. According to the study, exercise helps maintain the brain’s gray matter, which is linked to various skills and thinking abilities. So, keeping your gray matter intact may help prevent thinking declines, the German researchers explained. The…  read on >

You made your resolution — this year was finally going to be the year you lost weight. But then your neighbor stopped by with a plate of cookies, and well, your resolve didn’t even last a day. Maybe next year? But instead of looking at your resolutions as a sweeping year-long project, what if you…  read on >

Pilates is an excellent exercise discipline that develops strength and agility, and you don’t need to take formal classes or use Pilates machines to get its benefits. Using a stability ball with floor exercises is tailor made to target your core — the muscles of your abdomen. Here are three to try from the American…  read on >

Lose weight. Eat healthier. Quit smoking. These are all popular New Year’s resolutions that are often only kept for a short time, if at all. About 40% of Americans make a New Year’s resolution, most of which are abandoned by February, according to researchers at Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. But Bernadette Melnyk, vice…  read on >

If you plan to make a New Year’s resolution about improving your health, the American Medical Association (AMA) has some good suggestions. “With too many holiday sweets and not enough exercise likely in the rearview mirror, now is the perfect time to consider your personal goals and how you can make positive health choices in…  read on >

Leave your car in the garage if you can: A new study suggests that walking or biking to work could cut your risk of a heart attack. The researchers analyzed 2011 data from 43 million working adults in England and found that 11.4% were active commuters, with 8.6% walking to work and 2.8% cycling to…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — The new year is an exciting time for fresh starts and new beginnings. As 2020 rolls around, you should recommit to your health and well-being, says Johns Hopkins Medicine. The school mentions these resolutions for a healthier new year: Practice mindful eating. Slow down and pay attention to your food. Get enough…  read on >

Bad balance is a common cause of dangerous falls, especially among older adults. Falls send more than 2 million adults to the emergency room every year and often result in lengthy rehab stays. Preventing falls is a priority for staying healthy and preventing painful broken bones as you age. Easy strength and balance exercises that…  read on >

It’s hard to escape all the fanfare surrounding HIIT, or high-intensity interval training, which prevents plateaus by keeping your body at your max heart rate for very short intervals. But another training approach called steady-state training, or SST, may be just as important, if not more so, depending on what you’re trying to accomplish. Steady-state…  read on >

If you travel a lot for business or pleasure, you may think that the most exercise possible is lugging your bags in and out of a car or through an airport. But it’s important to get in real exercise even when you’re away from home. If you’re a business road-tripper, look for snippets of time…  read on >