You know the scenario — your child has a meltdown, leaving you frustrated, embarrassed and arguing even though your brain says it’s a battle you’re not likely to win. Tantrums often start during the “terrible 2’s” because little ones can’t yet clearly voice their frustrations. But it’s never too late to correct the behavior, even…  read on >

Here’s another health danger climate change will deliver in the coming years: New research warns that back-to-back heat waves that go on for days will become more common as the planet warms. The elderly and the poor will be the least prepared to weather this threat, the investigators noted. But hospital ERs and emergency service…  read on >

Shhhhh. Preterm infants can benefit from quiet times in hospital neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), a new study says. High noise levels are known to harm health, and infants in NICUs are especially vulnerable, so some NICUs have created quiet times to limit potentially dangerous noise levels, according to the Acoustical Society of America. “Although…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Glucosamine has long been used as a supplement to help ease the joint pain of arthritis, but new research suggests its anti-inflammatory properties might also lower heart disease risk. The finding stems from a lifestyle survey involving more than 466,000 British men and women. None had been diagnosed with heart disease when…  read on >

The pain Sara Langill felt in her right hip didn’t concern her much, until she felt a lump as she massaged tendons near her hip flexors following a soccer game. “I felt this thing that felt like a rubbery grape,” recalls Langill, 33. Thinking it might be a hernia, she went to the doctor. Within…  read on >

Only half of Americans routinely protect themselves from the sun when outdoors, a recent American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) survey found. Those who don’t practice sun safety put themselves at increased risk for skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the United States, despite being one of the most preventable cancers. One in…  read on >

The loss of loved ones can hit the elderly particularly hard, but a new study suggests it’s anger, and not sadness, that may damage the aging body more. Anger can increase inflammation, which is linked with conditions such as heart disease, cancer and arthritis, the researchers said. “As most people age, they simply cannot do…  read on >