With the new coronavirus severely straining the U.S. health care system, experts are calling on heart attack and stroke survivors to take extra steps to reduce their risk of a repeat event. The American Heart Association (AHA) said current information suggests that elderly people with heart disease or high blood pressure are more likely to…  read on >

For people very sick with COVID-19, access to a mechanical ventilator can mean life or death. Trouble is, they’re in short supply in the United Sates and around the world. Now, research suggests that a widely used clot-busting stroke drug might help COVID-19 patients who can’t access a ventilator or who fail to improve even…  read on >

Fostering a shelter animal during the coronavirus pandemic could benefit both of you, an animal welfare group says. “Shelters are swamped in the best of times, and with more and more staff in every sector of American life self-quarantining and falling ill, animals already abandoned and without homes are going to be increasingly vulnerable,” said…  read on >

In a lesson for what can be achieved with social distancing, researchers report that school and workplace closures in Wuhan, China, reduced the number of coronavirus cases there. And officials are extending those measures until April now instead of March, which could hold off a second wave of cases until later this year, the researchers…  read on >

It has spread across the globe in just a few short months, sickening hundreds of thousands, but the new coronavirus has the dubious distinction of not really being a living organism, biologists say. “Viruses aren’t considered alive — in class, I call them pseudo-alive,” said Eric Mendenhall, an associate professor of biological sciences at the…  read on >

In a bit of good news about the novel coronavirus, one expert says it looks like livestock and poultry don’t appear to be at risk from COVID-19. The coronavirus most likely jumped from an animal species into humans and mutated into a virus that mostly affects people, said Jim Roth, director of the Center for…  read on >

With bogus information about the new coronavirus spreading fast online, how can you separate fact from fiction? A communications expert at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg said identifying reliable and useful sources of information is key. Here’s her advice: “Be skeptical of social media posts about the COVID-19 virus, even those that have the superficial look…  read on >