(HealthDay News) — Hotter temperatures bring people outdoors, but they also bring insects out of hiding, says NorthShore University. From mosquitoes to ticks, the summer months are a hotbed for bites from these insects. To protect against summer bugs, NorthShore recommends: Don’t apply perfumes, and avoid scented soaps. Stay away from stagnant water and wooded…  read on >

The heat is on. Across two-thirds of the United States, over 115 million Americans live where some level of heat alert is already in effect, and 290 million will see temperatures soar past 90 degrees at some point in the next week, USA Today reported Wednesday. As a dome of high pressure settles over much…  read on >

Financial rewards for quitting smoking do help smokers — including pregnant women — kick the habit and remain smoke-free, a new study confirms. “Rewards, such as money or vouchers, have been used to encourage smokers to quit, and to reward them if they stay stopped. Such schemes have been used in workplaces, in clinics and…  read on >

When it comes to blood pressure readings, the “top” number seems to grab all the attention. But a large, new study confirms that both numbers are, in fact, critical in determining the risk of heart attack and stroke. Blood pressure measurements are given as a “top” and “bottom” number. The first reflects systolic blood pressure,…  read on >

“Broken heart syndrome” may harm more than just the heart, new research suggests. While the extreme stress of losing a loved one has been linked to heart troubles in prior research, a new study found that one in six people with broken heart syndrome also had cancer. Even worse, they were less likely to survive…  read on >

Even if you are at high risk for Alzheimer’s disease, a little more exercise may buy you time, new research suggests. Folks with elevated levels of a brain protein called beta amyloid tend to be more likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease and experience rapid brain decline later in life, previous research has found. But apparently…  read on >

They’re gaining in popularity among women, and a new study finds menstrual cups to be just as safe and as effective as disposable pads or tampons. British researchers looked at data on the cost-saving devices, gleaned from 43 studies involving more than 3,300 women and girls worldwide. Reporting July 17 in The Lancet Public Health,…  read on >

The rotator cuff refers to a group of four distinct muscles and tendons that connect to each shoulder and stabilize the humerus, the upper arm bone. These muscles are engaged when you move your shoulder, and work together to give you the needed range of motion to toss a ball or reach for an object…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Stress is a normal physical and emotional reaction to changes in life. However, long-term stress can contribute to digestive issues, headaches, sleep disorders and other health problems. Relaxation techniques can help release tension and counteract stress, says the U.S. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH). These techniques incorporate breathing and…  read on >

— (HealthDay News) Even with long-term treatment, HIV can still be found in the cerebrospinal fluid of some people with the AIDS-causing virus, a new study reports. And these patients are at increased risk of having thinking problems, the researchers say. “It is difficult to target infections that lurk in the brain, and HIV is…  read on >