(HealthDay News) — Although there is a tornado season between May and June in the Southern Plains, June and July in the central United States, and earlier in the spring on the Gulf Coast, tornados can form off season. The National Safety Council suggests how to stay safe during a tornado: Seek shelter in a…  read on >

If you use Airbnbs or other vacation rentals, it might be a good idea to check first on their fire safety. A new study found that while many Airbnbs in the United States had smoke alarms, less than half had fire extinguishers or first-aid kits. The research was led by Vanya Jones, of the Johns…  read on >

Motorcycles are still deadlier than cars, but there’s some good news: Nearly 6 percent fewer bikers died on U.S. roads last year than in 2016, a new report says. Preliminary data indicate that there were 4,990 motorcyclist fatalities in the United States in 2017 — which is 296 fewer than the year before, according to…  read on >

A European woman who needed an implanted brain device got an unwelcome side effect during a storm: Nearby lightning switched the device off. Experts say the phenomenon is likely rare, and the deep brain stimulator device worked fine again once it was turned back on by doctors. Still, it’s a hazard worth looking out for,…  read on >

Hit-and-run deaths in the United States reached a record high in 2016, a new report shows. “Hit-and-run crashes in the United States are trending in the wrong direction,” said David Yang, executive director of the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. “Our analysis shows that hit-and-run crashes are a growing traffic safety challenge and the AAA…  read on >

If you suffer from allergies, you already know that pollen is in the air — even in the parts of the United States with unseasonably cool temperatures. So what kind of allergy season can we expect this year? Will we see a return of the pollen vortex? Might we have a blooming bombogenesis of pollen?…  read on >

Rear-facing car seats provide effective protection for children in rear-end crashes, researchers say. Previous studies have shown that rear-facing car seats significantly reduce infant and toddler injuries and deaths in front- and side-impact crashes. But there has been little data on rear-end crashes, which represent more than one-quarter of collisions, according to the Ohio State…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — State laws that require child-seat use among kids eight and younger save lives, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says. Among states that issued stricter laws requiring car seats until a child is at least 7 years old, deaths and serious injuries among children in vehicles fell 17 percent, the…  read on >