(HealthDay News) — Teen drivers are more likely to be involved in a car crash that results in injury or death than any other age group in the United States, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. Teens with less than 18 months of driving experience are much more at risk of a crash or near-crash…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Every three hours, someone in the United States is involved in an accident with a train, the National Safety Council says. There are about 212,000 railroad crossings in the United States. To help avoid an accident at a train crossing, the council suggests: Never try to beat a train at a crossing,…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Autumn is a particularly dangerous time to be out driving. The days are getting shorter, the weather can be unpredictable and wet leaves frequently cover the roads. The American Association of Retired Persons suggests these Autumn driving tips: Watch for kids. They may line the streets waiting for buses, biking or walking.…  read on >

As category 4 Hurricane Michael slammed into northern Florida on Wednesday, the National Safety Council offered residents steps to stay safe. First, the council urges those in the storm’s path to monitor its progress and heed government warnings. It’s vital to take a look at safety procedures you’ll need during any severe weather. Families should…  read on >

Hurricane Michael, now a powerful category 4 storm, is expected to make landfall in northern Florida Wednesday. And as with every such storm, power outages will occur, along with the risk of deadly carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning from gas-powered generators. “Unfortunately, poison control centers continue to see surges in generator-associated carbon monoxide poisonings during and…  read on >

Following years of decline, fatal car accidents involving teen drivers have accelerated in the United States, a leading group of U.S. pediatricians warns. New research also reveals that teenage drivers are more likely to be involved in a serious or deadly crash than any other age group, notes the American Academy of Pediatrics. The group…  read on >

In the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, residents of the Carolinas are facing a new health threat: mold. Mold-related illnesses are a serious concern following severe flooding in North and South Carolina, say experts from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine. “Where there’s dampness and water, there’s mold,” said Paula Schenck, of the division of…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Crowded airports and planes can seem daunting to parents travelling with small children, especially when the unpredictability of air travel is factored in. The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests how to make air travel less stressful: Get to the airport early, especially when traveling with a younger child — to give your…  read on >

As Florence unleashes her full fury on the Carolinas, residents who stayed put need to know that flooding will be even more dangerous than the high winds of this hurricane. Making landfall near Wrightsville Beach, N.C., around 7 a.m. Friday, the category 1 hurricane was pounding the historic town of New Bern, which sits just…  read on >

With Hurricane Florence barreling toward the Carolinas, the National Safety Council offers steps to stay safe. As mass evacuations begin in coastal North Carolina, and states of emergency are declared in Virginia and North and South Carolina, the council urges those along the East Coast to monitor the storm’s path and heed government warnings. Florence,…  read on >