(HealthDay News) — Snow shoveling is a factor in thousands of injuries and as many as 100 deaths in the United States each year. The National Safety Council suggests how to shovel safely: Do not shovel after eating or while smoking. Take it slow and stretch out before you begin. Shovel only fresh, powdery snow;…  read on >

Just because it’s not summer doesn’t mean you’re safe from sun-related skin damage. “The highest level of concern is usually during the summer months, but sun damage can occur year-round, even on cloudy or rainy days,” said dermatologist Dr. Sarah Taylor, an assistant professor at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C. “In fact,…  read on >

Driver fatigue causes many more car accidents in the United States than previously estimated, a new report suggests. The finding comes from an analysis of several months’ worth of video recordings taken of nearly 3,600 Americans while they were driving. During that time, participating drivers were involved in 700 accidents. All participants’ vehicles had been…  read on >

Don’t count on physicians to keep drivers with dementia off the roads, a new study cautions. In-person license renewal and driver vision testing laws are more effective than mandatory doctor reporting of patients with dementia, researchers found. “The results of our study point to age-based licensing requirements as an effective way to improve safety,” said…  read on >

Winter can be harsh on your skin, especially your hands and face. Try these fast, easy and inexpensive steps to avoid the chapping and flaking that comes with the season. Resist taking hot showers and long soaks, both of which remove your skin’s natural oil barrier, causing it to dry out more easily, suggests the…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Seniors are at heightened risk of hypothermia, the medical term for low body temperature. Older adults lose body heat faster than when they were younger, the U.S. National Institute on Aging says. Hypothermia occurs when a person’s body temperature drops to 95 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Typical warning signs include slowed or…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Many workplace vehicles have backup alarms, but the alarms don’t prevent backover accidents altogether. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) suggests how to help prevent backover accidents: Ensure that trained spotters use hand signals to alert drivers about when it’s safe to proceed. Drivers should remain in visual contact with…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Severe weather, an earthquake, a fire or flood all present unique challenges for people with Alzheimer’s disease. Their impaired memory and reasoning severely limits their ability to act appropriately during a crisis, the National Institute on Aging says. If you are preparing an emergency kit for someone who has Alzheimer’s, the agency…  read on >

Older adults are at increased risk for hypothermia, a dangerous drop in body temperature, the U.S. National Institute on Aging warns. This can be due to chronic health conditions or the use of certain medicines, including over-the-counter cold remedies. Hypothermia occurs when your core body temperature drops to 95 degrees Fahrenheit or lower. Warning signs…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Winter storms are a fact of life in many cold climates. And if conditions are bad enough, the safest place is probably your home. The National Weather Service suggests what to do if you’re stuck inside: If using a fireplace or wood stove, make sure these devices are properly vented. If you…  read on >