The number of parks, libraries and natural resources in the state where you reside might have a great deal to do with how happy you are. New research suggests that Americans who live where more money is spent on these “public goods” are happier than their counterparts in other states. “Public goods are things you…  read on >

If you have children, you know how important it is to keep up with their immunization schedule. But getting vaccines and booster shots is vital throughout adulthood as well. The most common adult shot is the yearly flu vaccine, recommended for just about every adult. Some fight three flu strains, others, four. However, there’s more…  read on >

Skiing, snowboarding, skating and sledding are great ways to have winter fun, but be sure to take steps to reduce your risk of injuries, experts say. In 2017, U.S. emergency departments, doctors’ offices and clinics treated: 68,809 people for skiing-related injuries, 54,349 people for snowboard-related injuries, 52,308 people for ice skating-related injuries, and 4,499 people…  read on >

If you pledged to hit the gym this year, take some steps to prevent skin infections, an expert says. “While skin infections are not a reason to cancel your gym membership, it’s important to follow a few simple steps to avoid germs while you’re at the gym,” said Dr. Brian Burke Adams, professor and chair…  read on >

Problems with flu vaccine distribution in the United States may cost lives and pose a serious threat in the event of a flu pandemic, researchers warn. However, a computer model shows that proposed changes to the current distribution system could save thousands of lives, said study co-leader Pinar Keskinocak. She and her colleagues recommend replenishing…  read on >

Quitting smoking is one of the hardest things to do, but studies have found that one strategy in particular can help many people: Start anti-smoking medication well before your intended quit date. Under traditional prescribing guidelines, people who plan to quit smoking with the help of a medication begin taking their anti-smoking drug about one…  read on >

Tainted food, trash-filled parklands and even hungry kids: Public health could be increasingly at risk as the U.S. government shutdown drags into its 21st day, experts say. Crucial inspections intended to protect Americans have either been curtailed or are not being performed because the responsible federal workers have been furloughed, said Dr. Georges Benjamin, executive…  read on >

Pregnant women who get a flu shot protect not only themselves, but also their developing baby, health officials report. When a mom-to-be gets the flu, she can be so sick she needs to be admitted to a hospital’s intensive care unit. And new research finds her baby then runs the risk of being born preterm,…  read on >

A large, new analysis helps confirm that eating lots of grains, vegetables and fruit lowers your risk of dying early from cancer or heart disease. When compared with those who consume very little fiber, people at the high end of the fiber-eating spectrum saw their risk for dying from heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes…  read on >

Every day they help feed, bathe and care for the frailest Americans. But female health care workers in the United States often get shortchanged on wages and health insurance, a new study finds. In fact, about one-third of female health care workers made less than $15 an hour, and that number rose to half when…  read on >