(HealthDay News) — The last place you should fear getting sick is in a doctor’s waiting room. The American Academy of Pediatrics has updated its guidelines for pediatricians to prevent the spread of germs. The group says all pediatric medical offices should: Equip waiting rooms with alcohol-based hand sanitizers and masks. Put up visual reminders…  read on >

Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, texting: Sometimes it seems today’s young adults are online more often than not. But new research suggests that the amount of time young adults spend on social media doesn’t seem to affect their risk for mental health problems. The finding came from a study of 467 young adults who were asked about…  read on >

Sibling rivalry — the jealousy and competition between your children — can start even before baby number two is born, according to experts at the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital of Michigan Medicine. How siblings relate to each other and to parents can change as they go through the stages of childhood. Toddlers starting to assert…  read on >

Fun, decorative drinking glasses may contain potentially harmful levels of lead and cadmium, a new British study says. University of Plymouth researchers analyzed 72 new and second-hand decorated drinking glasses, including tumblers, beer and wine glasses, and jars. Around 7 out of 10 tested positive for lead or cadmium, both toxic metals. Lead was found…  read on >

The number of food ads targeting American children has declined, but most of the ads they do see are for unhealthy foods, a new study finds. Under a voluntary initiative launched in 2007, major food and beverage companies agreed to reduce unhealthy product advertising to children younger than 12. The study found, though, that children…  read on >

Can caffeine help people with chronic kidney disease live longer? That’s the suggestion of a new study that found that among more than 2,300 Americans with chronic kidney disease, those who drank the most caffeinated drinks reduced their risk of premature death by 24 percent. “Our study showed a dose-dependent protective effect of caffeine consumption…  read on >

A teenage school shooter may be attempting to prove his masculinity. So says an Oregon researcher who analyzed the traits shared by 31 boys involved in 29 mass shootings at U.S. schools. The attacks occurred between 1995 and 2015, and the killers ranged in age from 11 to 18 years old. The total number of…  read on >

Nearly 18 percent of kids have a chronic health condition, such as asthma or allergies. If your child is one of them, working successfully with your school’s nurse will help keep him or her safe. Because a good chunk of a child’s day is spent in school, it’s important to communicate clearly and regularly with…  read on >