You know that wearing seat belts and putting kids in appropriate car seats can save lives, but are you doing all you can to make your car a safe environment for little ones? Hundreds of thousands of car seats are recalled for safety defects every year, with more than 6 million recalled in 2014, the…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — High summer temperatures pose a particular risk for the elderly, the National Institute on Aging says. Because of poor circulation and other factors, older people typically are at greater risk of heat-related illnesses, such as heat stroke, heat cramps and heat exhaustion. The agency offers this “to-do” list if you think someone…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Traveling with someone with a disability may seem daunting, but things are likely to go a lot smoother with some preparation. AARP offers this advice: Contact the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) at least 72 hours before departure to explain your loved one’s needs. The number is: 855-787-2227. When you leave, bring all…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — After a mastectomy, many women prefer to wear a prosthesis, in lieu of reconstructive surgery. The prosthesis often is made of silicone gel or foam, and will be placed inside a bra or directly on a woman’s chest. Sometimes. a prosthesis can pose difficulties when traveling by plane. The Susan G. Komen…  read on >

Every nine days, a child dies in a hot car in the United States, but a safety expert says such tragedies can easily be prevented. “Three letters can help drivers remember to take proper safety precautions with children when traveling in the car: A, C, T,” said Susan Katz, coordinator of the pediatric injury prevention…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — West Nile Virus is an infection that is spread by mosquitoes, and is commonly found in Africa, West Asia and the Middle East. The virus made its way to the United States in 1999 and has been reported in 48 states, the American Academy of Family Physicians says. The main symptoms of…  read on >

Taking time off reduces many workers’ stress and re-energizes them, but those benefits disappear once they’re on the job again, researchers say. Moreover, many people said they’re unable to relax and enjoy their time away from the office at all, according to a new poll of more than 1,500 American adults who work full- or…  read on >

Before you head out for a sunny summer getaway, get familiar with the signs of heat-related illnesses. Once at your destination, build in time for your body to adjust to the climate. If you’re lounging by the water and taking only short walks, your risk of a heat illness is low. But if you’re not…  read on >

(HealthDay News) — Nothing can ruin a summer vacation faster than an unexpected trip to the hospital. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration offers these suggestions for a healthier vacation: Avoid tanning or spending too much time in the sun. Check your medications before you leave to make sure you have enough. Never pack medication…  read on >

During the summer when people trade in their jackets and jeans for flip flops and bathing suits, more skin is exposed to the sun’s harmful UV rays. Dr. Katherine Gordon, assistant professor of dermatology at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, said summer is the perfect time for people to get in the habit of…  read on >